Showing posts with label mHSPC. Show all posts
Showing posts with label mHSPC. Show all posts

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Two new advanced hormonal agents (apalutamide and enzalutamide) increase survival in metastatic hormone sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC)

Erleada (apalutamide) has already been FDA-approved for use in non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (non-m CRPC), which affects relatively few men (remembering that metastatic was defined by bone scan/CT rather than PET scan). Now we have evidence that it increases overall survival in men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC).

Chi et al. reported the early results of the TITAN randomized clinical trial at the ASCO meeting. The trial was conducted at 230 sites in the US and internationally. Patients received 240 mg/day of apalutamide (n=525) or placebo (n=527) plus ADT.

  • It was double blinded.
  • Prior treatments were allowed.
  • 8% had prior treatment for localized PC
  • 11% had prior docetaxel
  • 63% had high-volume metastases
  • 37% had low-volume metastases
After almost 2 years median follow-up, the outcomes were as follows:
  • Apalutamide reduced mortality by 33%
  • Apalutamide reduced radiographic progression or mortality by 52%
  • Benefit was seen in all subgroups (i.e, volume of metastases and prior treatments)
  • Time to docetaxel treatment was 61% longer in men getting apalutamide.
  • Because of the success, men getting placebo were allowed to get apalutamide
  • Grade 3 (serious) and grade 4 (life-threatening) toxicities were similar in both groups (41-42%)
  • Discontinuations due to adverse events were low in both groups (8% for apalutamide, 5% for placebo)
(Update 9/18/19 It has been FDA approved for this indication).

Xtandi (enzalutamide) has been FDA-approved since 2012 for mCRPC after docetaxel and since 2014 for mCRPC before docetaxel. Sweeney et al.  reported the results of the ENZAMET randomized clinical trial at the ASCO meeting and in the NEJM. 1,125 patients at 82 sites in Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, Canada, and the UK received 160 mg/day of enzalutamide plus ADT or a first-generation anti-androgen (AA) (bicalutamide, nilutamide, or flutamide) plus ADT. It was unblinded and was reported earlier than expected.
  • 3-year overall survival (3yrOS) was 79% for enzalutamide vs 72% for AA (Hazard Ratio = 0.66 - statistically significant)
  • For men with high volume metastases, 3yrOS was 71% for enzalutamide vs 63% for AA (Hazard Ratio = 0.74 - not statistically significant)
  • For men with low volume metastases, 3yrOS was 89% for enzalutamide vs 82% for AA (Hazard Ratio = 0.48 -  statistically significant)
  • For men who also planned to receive early docetaxel, 3yrOS was 73% for enzalutamide vs 74% for AA (Hazard Ratio = 0.91 - not statistically significant)
  • For men who did not plan to receive early docetaxel, 3yrOS was 83% for enzalutamide vs 70% for AA (Hazard Ratio = 0.51 - statistically significant)
Toxicity was higher for enzalutamide:
  • Serious adverse events occurred in 42% of those taking enzalutamide vs 34% for AA
  • Treatment discontinuation due to adverse events occurred in 33 patients taking enzalutamide vs 14 patients for AA
  • Adverse events were higher in those who had taken docetaxel
  • Fatigue was more common for men taking enzalutamide
  • Seizures occurred in 7 patients taking enzalutamide and no patients for AA
(update 12/16/2019: It has been FDA approved for this indication)

Based on these successes, I'm sure the FDA will fast-track approval for both drugs for this new indication, joining Zytiga and Taxotere. Because they are already available for another indication, insurance may allow them off-label even sooner. The cost for either is about $12,000 for a 30-day supply. It is unknown if they are any more effective than abiraterone, which is now available as a new formulation called Yonsa for about $10,000 per month.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Newly diagnosed, metastatic (M1), but still hormone sensitive - best options

(Frequently Updated)

In the US, only 3% of new patients are newly diagnosed with metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC). "Metastatic," for the purposes of this analysis only includes distant metastases (Stage M1), but not pelvic lymph node metastases (Stage N1). This group has been the subject of many major randomized clinical trials over the last few years. CHAARTED, in the US, randomized to early docetaxel + androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) compared to ADT alone. STAMPEDE, in the UK and Switzerland,  has published several studies: one on the use of Zometa and Celebrex, one on docetaxel,  one on abiraterone+prednisolone (I'll refer to this combination as Zytiga), and two on debulking the prostate with radiation (one from STAMPEDE and one from HORRAD). They also included men with locally advanced and recurrent prostate cancer, which we will address at another time (see this link). 

LATITUDE was a multinational clinical trial comparing Zytiga+ADT to ADT alone. TITAN was a multinational trial comparing apalutamide (Erleada) +ADT to ADT alone. ENZAMET was a multinational trial comparing enzalutamide (Xtandi) + ADT to early antiandrogens +ADT. ARCHES assessed the effect of enzalutamide on radiographic progression-free survival. TITAN and ENZAMET are discussed in more detail here.

We can look at hazard ratios for overall survival. A hazard ratio (HR) of, say, 0.60 means that the treatment reduced the number of deaths by 40% compared to the standard treatment. Unless it is otherwise noted, the HRs we talk about are all statistically significant with 95% confidence.

Early use of docetaxel

The hazard ratios found for all metastatic men were as follows:
CHAARTED: 0.61
STAMPEDE: 0.81
GETUG-15: 0.90 (not statistically significant)

The hazard ratios for men with high volume mets only were:
CHAARTED: 0.60
GETUG-15: 0.8 (not statistically significant)
STAMPEDE: 0.81 (not statistically significant)

The hazard ratio for men with low volume mets only were:
CHAARTED: 1.03 (not statistically significant)
STAMPEDE: 0.76 (not statistically significant)

GETUG-15 was a French randomized clinical trial. It has been criticized for including men with more advanced disease than CHAARTED. When STAMPEDE showed similar results to CHAARTED, GETUG-15 was largely ignored, and early use of docetaxel became the new standard of care. Some argued that the  results of STAMPEDE and CHAARTED suggest that docetaxel should be considered for among all metastatic men, but a CHAARTED update suggests a benefit only among those with high volume of metastases. However, a STAMPEDE update showed no difference in overall survival or failure-free survival between the two subgroups. The STAMPEDE authors point to their larger trial and that their analysis applies more to newly diagnosed men, whereas the CHAARTED groups had more previously treated men. They advocate early use of docetaxel regardless of metastatic burden. (High volume was defined as visceral metastases or 4 or more bone mets with at least one beyond the pelvis or vertebrae.)

One should resist the temptation to compare HRs across studies. Each study had different patient characteristics, and PSA screening policies differ markedly in those countries. In fact, a recent analysis of the STAMPEDE outcomes of men who were randomly assigned to either Zytiga or docetaxel found that there was no difference in survival between the two treatments (see this link).

Early use of Zytiga

The hazard ratios found for all metastatic men were as follows:
LATITUDE: 0.66
STAMPEDE: 0.61

An unplanned secondary analysis presented at ESMO 2018 looked at high volume vs low volume, and found it worked equally well in both situations:

The hazard ratios for men with high volume mets only were:
STAMPEDE: 0.60

The hazard ratio for men with low volume mets only were:
STAMPEDE: 0.64

Early use of Erleada

The hazard ratio for metastatic men was 0.67

Early use of Xtandi

The  hazard ratio for all metastatic men was 0.66

The hazard ratio for men with high volume mets only was 0.74 - not statistically significant

The hazard ratio for men with low volume mets only was 0.48 - statistically significant


Early use of Debulking

The hazard ratios found for all metastatic men were as follows:
STAMPEDE: 0.92  (not statistically significant)
HORRAD:  0.90 (not statistically significant)

The hazard ratios for men with high volume mets only were:
STAMPEDE: 1.07 (not statistically significant)

The hazard ratio for men with low volume mets only were:
STAMPEDE: 0.68 (statistically significant)

Early use of Zometa+Celebrex

The hazard ratios found for all metastatic men were as follows:
STAMPEDE: 0.78 (see this link)

Which is best? 

The no-brainer here is Zometa+Celebrex. As long as the patient doesn't have contraindications like heart disease or bad teeth, it is cheap, non-toxic, and reduced risk of death by 22% at the 43 month follow-up. Zometa is usually given along with ADT anyway, so it is hard to argue against including this combination along with Zytiga, Erleada or docetaxel.

The hormonal therapies have differing modes of action, but without a randomized clinical trial, it's impossible to say that one extends life more than the others. Xtandi and Zytiga are being compared in an ongoing arm of STAMPEDE. Zytiga prevents the formation of androgens by the adrenal glands and via intra-tumoral synthesis. A recent study suggests that it stops formation of testosterone by the testicles as well. Xtandi and Erleada block the androgen receptor and prevents its translocation into the nucleus, where it can invigorate the cancer even without outside androgens. Erleada also prevents "upgrading" of the androgen receptor - a mode of castration resistance where multiple copies of the androgen receptor appear on the cancer cell, so it can be activated by even the slightest amount of androgen. However, it is unknown whether it slows down castration resistance in clinical practice - the cancer cell evolves many workarounds. A small trial found that combining Zytiga and Xtandi did not improve survival in the castration-resistant setting. An ongoing clinical trial is investigating whether Erleada combined with Zytiga extends survival in the relapsed hormone-sensitive setting.

Because neither docetaxel nor Zytiga showed a clear survival advantage when men were randomized to one or the other (Sydes et al.), the decision must be made based on other factors.

Both docetaxel and Zytiga increase toxicity over ADT alone. In the LATITUDE trial, physicians reported grade 3-5 (serious to death) events among 68% taking Zytiga vs 52% on ADT only. Higher rates of grade 3 hypertension and hyperkalemia were observed. In the STAMPEDE trial, physicians reported grade 3-5 events among 47% of those taking Zytiga vs. 33% of those taking ADT only. Higher rates of hypertension and liver enzyme elevation were observed. In the TITAN trial (Erleada), where almost two-thirds had high-volume metastases, Grade 3 (serious) and Grade 4 (life-threatening) toxicities were similar (41-42%) for those who got apalutamide or placebo. In the ENZAMET trial, serious side effects were experienced by 42% of those taking Xtandi vs 34% of those taking an early antiandrogen. The rate of serious side effects is remarkably similar.

In the docetaxel trials, STAMPEDE reported grade 3-5 events among 52% taking docetaxel vs 32% taking ADT only. Neutropenia, lethargy and GI disorders were especially elevated. CHAARTED reported grade 3-5 events among 30% taking docetaxel. Neutropenia, fatigue, gastrointestinal and allergic reactions were elevated.

One might expect that the increase in toxic events would have been worse with docetaxel, but while they were different in kind, the incidence of all events requiring medical attention was similar for both treatments. All medicines seem to have lower incidence of side effects when they are used earlier, while patients are healthier.

One downside for Zytiga is cost. Zytiga costs about $9,000 per month and patients stayed on it for about 2 years so far (drug resistance is low when patients are ADT-naive). This use of Zytiga is now FDA-approved, so Medicare and most insurance should cover such early use. Lower cost generics have become available.

Docetaxel is available as a generic for a cost of about $9,000 for six 3-week cycles. Not only is it less expensive, it is covered by Medicare and all insurance. On a cost/benefit basis, it is preferable.

High volume/low volume of metastases

Planned subgroup analyses of both CHAARTED and STAMPEDE showed that certain different therapies may improve survival depending on the number of distant metastases found using a bone scan/CT. Remember that high volume was arbitrarily defined as visceral metastases or 4 or more bone mets with at least one beyond the pelvis or vertebrae; low volume is anything less than that (often referred to as oligometastatic).

For men who are diagnosed with a low volume of metastases (oligometastatic), debulking can add to survival. STAMPEDE recruited participants before the benefit of early Zytiga was known, so it is unknown how the two therapies might interact. It is reasonable to speculate that early Zytiga may be used to radio-sensitize the cancer to debulking with radiation. The role of metastasis-directed SBRT has yet to be proven, but may be considered when safe to do so.

In a post-hoc analysis of LATITUDE data, men with high volume disease benefited from early use of Zytiga, but men with low volume disease did not. In STAMPEDE, there was no difference - Zytiga was equally effective in both groups. Erleada also seems to be equally effective in both groups. However, LATITUDE had mostly high-volume disease men in its sample. For men with a high volume of metastases, docetaxel or Zytiga (but not debulking) may confer a survival benefit). Xtandi seems to benefit most those with low volume of metastases.


Can they be combined or sequenced?

There is a hint that docetaxel may have some efficacy in keeping Zytiga working longer. The androgen receptor always eventually becomes resistant to the effect of Zytiga. Sometimes resistance is attributable to a change in the androgen receptor called "the AR-V7 splice variant." There was a very small (n=14) trial at JH where they were looking at the role of the AR-V7 splice variant in resistance to second-line hormonals (Zytiga or Xtandi). In a few guys (6 out of 14) who were AR-V7 positive after that hormone therapy, they became AR-V7 negative after docetaxel treatment. This is also an effect that they were hoping that supraphysiological doses of testosterone might sometimes create (see this link).

This may work both ways. Hormonal agents may even re-sensitize the cancer to docetaxel after it has become docetaxel-resistant (see this link). It may turn out that alternating the use of chemo and advanced hormonals (and testosterone!) is a good strategy.

For logistical reasons, it may be useful to start with six cycles of docetaxel, which would take 15 weeks. In this way, Zytiga, Erleada or Xtandi can begin 15 weeks later. If one starts with Zytiga, it may take three or more years before it stops working and docetaxel can be tried (Among metastatic men, failure-free survival was about 4 years in STAMPEDE, radiographic progression-free survival was 33 months in LATITUDE). It seems that one can receive more therapies in less time if a patient begins with docetaxel.

It is possible that concomitant early use of Zytiga and docetaxel may have a synergistic effect on the cancer, and in preventing the onset of Zytiga resistance. This is pure conjecture and would have to be proved in a clinical trial. The downside is the cumulative side effects.

The other possibility is starting with docetaxel only and following up with the combination of Zytiga +ADT. By holding off on ADT use, it might delay some of the selective evolutionary pressure that leads to early Zytiga resistance. It is unknown whether early docetaxel without ADT has similar efficacy to the combination. Again, this is a good hypothesis to be tested in a clinical trial.


Will Provenge, Xofigo and Jevtana also be more beneficial if used earlier?

Isn't earlier always better? Not necessarily (see this link). Cancer is a moving target, continually altering its genetic make-up. What works when cancer is in one state may not necessarily work when cancer is in another state. There can be unpredictable interactions. Early and prolonged use of bicalutamide, for example, may actually eventually increase the cancer growth rate; yet, with cancers that have become castration-resistant, adding bicalutamide may sometimes slow it down.

Although Provenge is more effective when the patient's disease is less progressed (see this link), it was not any more effective when used for mHSPC (see this link). Xofigo is in a clinical trial for mHSPC, and Jevtana is in trials for use before docetaxel.

What about nuclear medicines?

An exciting new field is the use of nuclear medicines (alpha-emitters like Xofigo, and beta-emitters like Lu-177-PSMA). Their use has historically been restricted to men with mCRPC. There is a clinical trial of Lu-177-PSMA for men who are castration-resistant but are not yet detectably metastatic (see this link). The hope is that they can seek out and destroy micrometastases that may be in systemic circulation.

What happens if they are used later?

Most of the advanced prostate cancer medicines were approved for men who were metastatic and castration-resistant (mCRPC). In that setting, docetaxel adds a median survival of 3 months (see this link), compared to a median of 17 additional months among men with high volume metastases in the CHAARTED trial. Zytiga adds 4 months to survival among men who are castration-resistant and have had chemo (see this link). Median (50%) survival has not been reached with the limited follow-up of the STAMPEDE trial, but we can look at 60% survival and  note that the curves are diverging, so the median survival improvement is at least this large. In STAMPEDE, early Zytiga increased median survival by at least 18 months; In LATITUDE, early Zytiga increased median survival by 16.8 months.

We might surmise that if used after metastatic diagnosis but before castration-resistance sets in, the survival improvement might be somewhere in between. However, long-term use of ADT drives changes in the androgen receptor that might shorten the time during which Zytiga is effective. Docetaxel, on the other hand, remains effective even after advanced hormonal agents have been utilized.

What are the other alternatives for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC)?

Supraphysiological doses of testosterone alternating with ADT (called Bipolar Androgen Therapy or BAT) has shown efficacy in some men (see this link). Expanded trials will tell us which men are most likely to benefit from it.

Treatment of the prostate even after metastases have been discovered  (called "debulking") is an intriguing prospect. However, the most recent reported arm of the STAMPEDE trial showed that prostate-only radiation only provided a survival benefit in oligometastatic men (see this link). There are clinical trials at MD Anderson and Rutgers (not recruiting), and registries at UT Southwestern and MSKCC and the Los Angeles VA that will further explore this opportunity. Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto is using SBRT for this purpose (see this link). Other trials are ongoing in Europe (this one includes docetaxel and Zytiga): Ghent, and Hamburg.

Other early-use therapies are combined with ADT in clinical trials. These are no longer recruiting:
These are still recruiting:
This will be recruiting soon:





Monday, September 5, 2016

Testosterone to TREAT prostate cancer - are they crazy? No - it just may work. (mHSPC)

This is Part 2. In Part 1 we saw why bipolar androgen therapy (BAT) may be effective for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), and the evidence so far in support of that. In this part, we'll look at what we know about BAT in men with metastases who are still hormone sensitive (mHSPC). As you recall, BAT is an experimental therapy for metastatic prostate cancer involving the administration of rapidly alternating treatments of androgen deprivation (ADT) with high-dose testosterone.

In theory, the high doses of testosterone will help the patient feel better and perhaps offset some of the symptoms of ADT (e.g., loss of libido, hot flashes, bone loss, lean muscle loss, mental symptoms).

In pilot trials so far, BAT was able to restore sensitivity to second-line hormone therapy, like Zytiga or Xtandi, in some men who had become resistant to their effects. If it can reverse castration resistance, can it also slow down the development of castration resistance? 

Schweizer et al. report on 29 patients:
  • None of the men in the study had started on androgen deprivation yet.
  • None had symptoms.
  • 10 had a low burden of metastases.
  • 19 had no detectable metastases, but had recurrent disease after an attempt at a cure (i.e., their cancer was micrometastatic)
  • They were all hormone sensitive. That means their PSA went down to less than 4 ng/ml after 6 months of ADT

They then received 3 months of testosterone injections, and then 3 months of ADT. Those cycles continued for a total of 18 months. 
  • They report that 17 men (59%) were still able to achieve their PSA goal (<4 ng/ml) at the end of 18 months. That is, they were still hormone sensitive.
  • Of the 10 patients with detectable metastases at the start, metastases had shrunk completely in 4, and partially in 4. So 8 in 10 (80%) had a positive radiographic response to BAT.
  • Six patients had metastatic progression. 
  • So, 13-15 of the 19 (68-79%) men with recurrent PC with no detectable metastases at the start still had no detectable metastases after 18 months of BAT.
  • Evaluations of quality of life improved.
Since the CHAARTED and STAMPEDE clinical trials, the new standard of care for mHSPC is the combination of ADT and docetaxel chemotherapy. Where would BAT fit in? We saw in Part 1 that BAT may work particularly well in conjunction with chemotherapy that targets the DNA responsible for cell replication. Docetaxel is usually administered in 6 three-week cycles. It may turn out that after an ADT induction period of 6 months, patients may be optimally treated by a high dose of testosterone and docetaxel concurrently. Testosterone would help the chemo patient feel better, and would also tend to raise his red blood cell counts, counteracting any chemo-induced anemia.

Another consideration is whether radiation ought to be included in the mix of early treatments. A few recent studies (see this link and this one) suggest that prostate radiation might still be beneficial to the metastatic patient. Moreover, a lab study suggests that radiation and BAT may be a particularly potent combination.

At this point, all of this is pure speculation. Future expanded clinical trials will have to determine whether BAT is useful for men with mHSPC, and what the optimal sequencing of therapies should be.